Programs

Major in International and Global Studies

The major in International and Global Studies examines the economic, political and socio-cultural processes that in both the past and present have contributed to the creation of our globalized world. The cross-border flows we see today of people, media, technology, politics and finance are not new, but they operate on a new level of complexity and speed such that our world is now inextricably interconnected and interdependent at the most fundamental levels of human organization and practice. Global citizenship today requires understanding that contemporary cultural, political and economic phenomena are transnational in nature, crossing borders and boundaries in both creative and destructive ways. However, it also requires knowledge that global processes are not abstract and disembodied forces, but rather are processes that humans create and maintain. As such, they are shaped by the specific cultural and historic structures that inform human interactions in particular places. Thus, the major in International and Global Studies allows students to combine study of global forces with both analysis and real-world experience of how these global forces shape and re-shape the lives of human beings living in specific cultural contexts.

The skills students learn from the combination of course work, abroad experience, and language learning foster their successful navigation of this complex global world. The interdisciplinary approach to the topic of globalization and its localization in distinct world regions allows students to perceive the value of distinct perspectives. In the senior seminar and comprehensive exams, they learn to integrate and synthesize those perspectives across disciplinary and thematic boundaries in the creation of a more holistic view of the topic or problem they seek to address. Through abroad experiences students apply knowledge learned in the class room to real-world settings, and in the process develop language-learning skills, and learn to interact constructively across cultural, economic, and political boundaries.

Core Requirements
The minimal degree requirements for students majoring in IGS consist of 10 full courses and a comprehensive examination to be taken in the senior year. Of the 10 courses taken for the major, two courses are required: an introductory course (InGS 200) to be taken in the sophomore year, and a senior capstone seminar (InGS 400) to be taken in the fall of the senior year. The remaining courses are eight distributed electives, one of which will likely be taken in a foreign language. If one of the eight distributed electives is not taken in a foreign language, then one additional language course (for a total of 11 courses) must be taken to complete the major (see below for more on the language requirement). Lastly, no more than four of the eight elective courses may be taken from any one department.

The major course of study is divided into two broad categories: “thematic” which investigates global processes of various types, and “geographic” which explores how global forces are materialized differently in different contexts. The “thematic” and “geographic” categories are further sub-divided into sub-categories of courses upon which students may focus their studies:
Geographic Sub-categories: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean,The Middle East, Russia and Eurasia;  and
Thematic Sub-categories: Global Capitalism, Global Culture and Society, and Global Politics5
Students take eight elective courses, four of which must be thematic, and four of which must be geographic. Four courses must be in a single sub-category, and the remaining four can be taken in a single sub-category, or split evenly (2/2) between two other sub-categories. Students may not take fewer than two courses in any sub-category, and may not take more than four courses in any sub-category. The chart below illustrates the range of three options available to students:

  Geographic Thematic
    Sub-category 
  Sub-category 
 Option 1 
4 4
 Option 2 
2/2 4
 Option 3 
4 2/2

Option 1: Four courses in a single thematic sub-category and four courses in a single geographic sub-category (such as Global Capitalism and Asia).

Option 2: Four courses in a single thematic sub-category (such as Global Culture and Society), and four more courses split between two geographic sub-categories (such as Latin America and the Caribbean, and Europe).

Option 3: Four courses split between two thematic sub-categories (such as Global Culture and Society and Global Politics), and four courses in a single geographic sub-category (such as Russia and Eurasia).

Many of the courses offered in the IGS catalogue require introductory level prerequisites. We encourage students who are considering the IGS major to review the courses they are especially interested in taking, and make sure they have taken the required introductory-level courses in their respective departments. These may count toward the General Distribution Requirements and/or a minor field of study. We strongly urge students to consider the relevance of a minor field of study to their overall educational and career goals, and to use a minor to complement and strengthen their IGS major.

Shortly after signing up for the IGS major, students determine in consultation with their advisor and the chair their planned course of study in the major. This should include discussion not only of planned areas of focus, but also the abroad experiences, language training, and possible minor course of study that make the most sense for that student. Keeping the coherence of the educational experience in mind is especially important in IGS as the senior thesis (written in InGS 400) depends upon it. Nonetheless, the planned program of study may be subject to change as the student progresses through the major, and should be reviewed with the advisor and chair should this occur.

Comprehensive Examination:  Each student completes a comprehensive examination in the first semester of their senior year. The comprehensive is broadly integrative, consisting of two parts. The first part is a seminar paper written in InGS 400 that integrates materials from the eight elective courses taken in the student’s chosen thematic and geographic sub-categories of focus. The second part is an essay answering a question about themes and concepts in globalization learned in InGS 200 and 400

Abroad Experience and Language Requirements

General Guidelines for Study Abroad
Work or study abroad is among the most valuable experiences preparing students for a successful future in a globalizing world. Through an abroad experience, students are challenged to work through real-world issues with persons whose understanding and approach may differ considerably from their own. IGS deems the ideal abroad experience as one, which allows students to experience a semester-long immersion in a cultural, social, and linguistic milieu different from their own. However, some summer abroad programs are also appropriate for IGS majors. Many IGS majors choose to spend more than a single semester or single summer abroad, combining study abroad with intensive language training, research, internships, or other types of practical engagement or field-based experience. The IGS website contains a resource page on appropriate abroad programs and experiences for students with particular thematic and geographic interests. As all abroad experiences must be approved by the student’s advisor and the chair, we strongly advise students considering the major to consult the website and speak with a program committee member before deciding upon a study abroad option. Up to three courses may be approved for transfer to the IGS major from a study abroad program.

Petitions for exceptions to the standard abroad experience
The abroad experience should contribute to the overall coherence of a student’s chosen program of study such that the courses taken in a geographic sub-category, the additional language study, and the country where the abroad experience occurs ideally match up. However, we do allow students to study in English-dominant settings, and to use itinerant experiences (i.e., abroad experiences which involve extensive travel to more than one country), but students must petition for permission to use these types of programs in fulfillment of the abroad requirement. Exceptions to the requirement for experience abroad under conditions of hardship may be granted through the mechanism of a written petition considered by the chair in consultation with the program committee and the student’s advisor.

Language Requirement
Language-learning skills facilitate students’ participation in a globalized world, and for this reason, all IGS majors must take one foreign language course in addition to the usual 300-level course required for General Education in the college. This course may be at the 300- or 400-level in the same foreign language, or may be at any level in another language. In many cases, one of the eight elective courses taken in either a thematic or geographic sub-category will be taught in a foreign language, and this course thus satisfies the language requirement as well. If a second foreign language is proposed, the student must gain approval of the advisor and the chair. Whether students do their additional language study at Sewanee, or pursue language study abroad depends on the availability of pertinent language study here, and a student’s own interests. The IGS website contains a resources page with further information about language study and intensive language programs.

Honors
In October of their senior year, students may apply for honors if they have a 3.5 grade point average in the major. To apply, students submit a project proposal to the department chair for a 35-page paper to be written in consultation with and evaluated for Honors by two members of the IGS faculty. If the proposal is approved, students will register for a full course (InGS 405: Honors Thesis) taken in the second semester of the senior year. Honors theses must be completed and presented in a public forum in April of the senior year.

Minor
Students may minor in International and Global Studies by taking InGS 200, two courses from a single thematic sub-category, and two courses from a single geographic sub-category.

Required Courses
InGS 200: Introduction to International and Global Studies
InGS 400: International and Global Studies Senior Seminar

Thematic and geographic sub-categories from which students must choose eight electives:
I. Thematic: Courses in this category deal with transnational forms of political, economic, and cultural organization and practice in both the past and the present.

A. Global Capitalism: Courses in this sub-category deal with issues related to the rise and spread of capitalism as well as the growing economic integration of the world’s economies. Themes covered include the history of capitalism, socialism, and other forms of economic activity, social and economic development, trade networks and practices, the experiences of work and social life as these are transformed through economic integration, and strategies for addressing economic inequality and poverty.

Anth 317: The Anthropology of Development
Econ 309: Women in the Economy
Econ 310: Economic Development
Econ 311: Health and Development
Econ 326: Growth Theory
Econ 335: Environmental Economics
Econ 336: Energy Economics
Econ 343: International Trade
Econ 344: International Finance
Econ 345: Economic Development in China
Econ 346: Introduction to Asian Development
Econ 347: Microfinance Institutions in South Asia
Econ 348: Social Entrepreneurship
Econ 381: The Political Economy of Sustainable Development [also PolS 381]
Fren 417: Topics of the French-Speaking World (Rung)
Hist  346: History of Socialism
Hist  403: Capitalism in Britain and the United States
Hist  410: Five Centuries of Atlantic Slavery, 1400-1900
Hist  420: The History of International Development
Ings  301: Global Financial Crisis: Causes and Effects
Pols  210: The Politics of Poverty
Pols  366: International Political Economy
Pols  367: Political Economy of Asia and Latin America
Pols  382: International Environmental Policy
Pols  402: Globalization
Pols  431: Ethnicity and Political Violence

B. Global Culture and Society: Courses in this sub-category are focused on the transnational circulation of people, ideas, and culture, especially shared symbolic media and knowledge transfers, but also the histories of interaction such as missionization, colonialism, and migration that help to produce them. Issues addressed include global cultural aspirations, the creation of hybrid cultural forms, and the specter of a homogenized global culture.

Anth  290: Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Anth  319: Medical Anthropology
ArtH  108: History of Film: Invention to Mid-Century
ArtH  315: Islamic Spain and Spanish Art
Asia  203: Chinese Martial Arts Cinema
Asia  204: Themes in New Chinese Cinema
Asia  233: The Fantastical World of Anime
Econ 311: Health and Development
Engl  399: World Literature in English
Film  105: Introduction to World Cinema
Film  109: History of Film: Mid-Century to the Present
Fren  314: Introduction to Literature of the French-Speaking World
Fren  321: Studies in Culture and Literature Abroad
Fren  405: The Eighteenth Century
Fren  411: Culture through History
Fren  413: Modern France through Films and Other Texts
Fren  417: Topics of the French-Speaking World
Fren  419: Introduction to French Linguistics
Grmn 356: The Nazi Period (also Hist 353)

Grmn 357: German Queer Cinema
Hist   210: Early Modern Cities
Hist   218: The Age of the Enlightenment
Hist   298: History of Islam
Hist   308: The Revolutionary Era
Hist   324: Colonial and Imperial Warfare in North America and Southern Africa
Hist   331: Modern Cities: Capital, Colonial, Global
Hist   335: Monsters, Marvels, and Museums
Hist   346: History of Socialism
Hist   385: Missionaries, Mullahs, and Marabouts: African Encounters with Christianity and Islam
Hist   392: The Scientific Revolution
Hist   430: Political Islam
Hist   470: Ways of Seeing and Knowing in the Early Modern World
InGS  201: African Youth Cultures in Post-Colonial Urban Africa
InGS  202: Islam and the West
InGS  302: Global Cities
InGS  304: Politics and Society in Modern India
InGS  305: Narrating Place/Space in Contemporary World Film (also Film Studies)
InGS  308: Body/Film:  Representing the Body in Contemporary World Cinema
InGS  311: Islam and Ecology
InGS 313:  "Foreigners" of the Middle East
Musc  105: Introduction to World Music
Pols   333: Human Rights
Pols   382: International Environmental Policy
Pols   404: Race, Politics and Empire
Relg  220: The Holocaust, Religion, and Morality
Relg  232: God and Empire: Biblical Texts and Colonial Contexts
Relg  262: Buddhist Traditions
Relg  264: Hinduism
Rusn 355: Russian and Soviet Film
Span 330: The Middle Ages In Spanish Culture and Literature
Span 334: The Culture of Chivalry
Span 364: Spanish Women Writers
Span 388: Women Authors of the Hispanic Caribbean and its Diaspora
Span 389: U.S. Latino and Latina Literature and Culture
Span 404: The Spanish Civil War and its Legacy
Span 406: Cultural Icons In Latin America
Span 408: Migration in Latin American and Latino Literature and Film
Span 409: Marvel and Margin In Latin American Culture

C. Global Politics: Courses in this sub-category are focused on explaining transnational political processes in both the past and present. Training provides key conceptual frameworks related to the study of global power relations as they are manifested in political, economic, and cultural realms, and the operation of the global political system through the medium of inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations. These conceptual frameworks provide the essential context for students’ understanding of global problems such as international conflict and cooperation, development, security, social inequality, and human rights.

Econ 381: The Political Economy of Sustainable Development (also Pols 381)
Fren  417: Topics of the French-Speaking World (Glacet)
Hist   215: Southern African History
Hist   219: History of Africa to 1880
Hist   220: History of Africa since 1880
Hist   324: Colonial and Imperial Warfare in North America and Southern Africa
Hist   333: Topics in American History (The Cold War) (Walker)
Hist   359: United States and Latin America Since 1898
Hist   386: African Environmental History
Hist   430: Political Islam
Hist   456: Partition and Its Meanings:  India, Ireland, and Palestine
Hist   472: Marriage and Imagined Families in the Modern World
InGS 303: Transition to Democracy, The Case of East Germany, 1989
InGS 312: Africa and the West Since 1800
Pols  209: Immigration, Politics, and Identity
Pols  220: International conflict
Pols  227: Africa in World Politics
Pols  270: Introduction to International Security
Pols  311: Politics of Central America and the Caribbean
Pols  314: Civil Wars
Pols  318: Comparative Politics: South America and Mexico
Pols  319: Global Gender Issues
Pols  321: Global Health Governance
Pols  329: Comparative African Politics
Pols  333: Human Rights
Pols  339: The Political Economy of Development in Zambia and Botswana
Pols  346: Contemporary Social Movements
Pols  351: Modern European Politics
Pols  355: The Art of Diplomacy
Pols  357: Religion, Activism, and Socioeconomic Development in Africa
Pols  363: Comparative Democratization
Pols  364: European Union
Pols  365: Global Institutions and Policies
Pols  370: International Law in International Relations
Pols  382: International Environmental Policy
Pols  390: The United Nations
Pols  402: Topics in Political Economy
Pols  411: The Politics of Aids (Writing Intensive)
Pols  412: Terrorism and Global Security
Pols  430: Research Seminar: Topics of International Security
Pols  431: Ethnicity and Political Violence
Relg 344: Religion and Violence

II. Geographic: Courses in this category deal with the culture, history, and society of specific geographic contexts, as well as the ways these contexts are integrated into broader global interactions.

A. Africa: Courses in this sub-category enable students to both comprehend and move beyond established geographic, political, and popular understandings of Africa and Africans. Emphasis will be placed on unsettling Africa, focusing on its location within academic, literary, and popular discourses and within regional systems (e.g.: East Africa and the Indian Ocean World, West Africa and the Atlantic World, and North Africa and the Mediterranean and European World). These courses also examine how Africans have throughout history and to this day challenged the diplomatic, political, economic, cultural, and environmental constraints to living their lives, and their efforts to construct and re-imagine their local and regional relationships.

Anth 304: People and Cultures of Africa
Fren 417: Topics of the French-speaking World (only when Glacet teaches it does this course count)
Hist  215: Southern African History
Hist  219: History of Africa to 1880
Hist  220: History of Africa since 1880
Hist  385: Missionaries, Mullahs, and Marabouts: African Encounters with Christianity and Islam
Hist  386: African Environmental History
Hist  387: Slavery and the Slave Trade in Africa
Hist  410: Five Centuries of Atlantic Slavery, 1400-1900
Hist  420: The History of International Development
Ings  201: African Youth Cultures in Post-Colonial Urban Africa
Ings  203: Sociolinguistics of Africa
Ings  309: Society and Culture in Zambia
InGS 312: Africa and the West Since 1800
Pols  227: Africa in World Politics
Pols  230: Politics in Nigeria and South Africa
Pols  329: Comparative African Politics
Pols  339: The Political Economy of Development in Zambia and Botswana
Pols  357: Religion, Activism, and Socioeconomic Development in Africa

B. Asia: Courses in this sub-category contribute to students’ understanding of Asia as a region that was shaped by a number of cultural traditions such as Buddhism, Islam, and Confucianism that traveled across countries, as well as a set of countries that developed distinct responses to capitalist integration and interactions with western powers. With new economic and political ideas transforming countries in this part of the world, Asia is today a vibrant example of globalization. At the same time, the cultures of Asia have global reach and influence through their arts and manufacturing, and as models for poverty alleviation and industrialization. Asia is an area of remarkable diversity, growth, and dynamism that both influences and is influenced by the cultures outside of Asia.

Anth  341: The Culture and History of Southeast Asia
Asia  203: Chinese Martial Arts Cinema
Asia  204: Themes in New Chinese Cinema
Asia  209: Introduction to Japanese Civilization: From Samurai to Sony
Asia  217: Modern Japanese Literature
Asia  232: Father Emperor, Mother Land: Family and Nationalism in Modern Japan
Asia  235: Love in Modern Japan (Also WMST)
Asia  320: Gender and Sexuality in Japanese Culture
Hist   211: China: Inside the Great Wall
Hist   212: China: Manchus to Massacre, Dynasty in Dictatorship
Hist   216: History of Japan
Hist   221: History of India and South Asia I
Hist   388: The United States and Vietnam Since 1945
Ings  304: Politics and Society in Modern India
Phil   215: Chinese Philosophy
Pols  248: China's Environmental Crisis
Pols  249: China and the World
Pols  250: States and Markets in East Asia
Pols  326: Comparative Asian Politics
Pols  360: Chinese Politics
Pols  367: Political Economy of Asia and Latin America
Relg 162: Introduction to Asian Religions
Relg  262: Buddhist Traditions
Relg  264: Hinduism
Relg  364: Buddhist Ethics

C. Europe: European identities and culture have been shaped by global movements in religion and philosophy, politics, science and the arts over the course of the last two thousand years. The successful integration of most of its countries into a stable economic and political union established Europe as one of the biggest players in the global economy. But Europe is also facing difficult challenges. Colonialism and capitalism have shaped contemporary European realities, giving rise to growing immigration, cultural and political struggles related to religion and gender, as well as growing concerns about social inequity. Courses in this sub-category enable students to comprehend Europe’s unique heritage as well as its role and place in today’s world.

Anth  222: Celtic Culture and Archaeology
Anth  303: The Anthropology of Europe
Anth  387: Anthropology of Ireland
ArtH  214: Spanish Art, Western Art, and the Road to Santiago
ArtH  315: Islamic Spain and Spanish Art
ArtH  350: Spanish Painting
Fren  301: Discovering Paris
Fren  314: Introduction to Literature of the French-Speaking World
Fren  321: Studies in Culture and Literature Abroad
Fren  411: Culture through History
Fren  413: Modern France through Films and Other Texts
Fren  415: History of French Cinema
Fren  417: Topics of the French-Speaking World
Grmn 300: Introduction to German Literature
Grmn 311: German Culture and Composition
Grmn 312: German Culture and Composition
Grmn 313: Contemporary Language and Usage
Grmn 350: Berlin — Impressions of a City (also Hist 350)
Grmn 352: Kafka/Grass in Translation
Grmn 353: German Film
Grmn 354: Modern German Civilization
Grmn 356: The Nazi Period (also Hist 353)

Grmn 357: German Queer Cinema
Hist    205: History of England
Hist    206: History of England
Hist    209: Early Modern Europe, 1450-1800
Hist    217: Renaissance and Reformation
Hist    268: Modern German History
Hist    270: European Women in War, Revolution, and Terrorism
Hist    272: France since 1815
Hist    308: The Revolutionary Era
Hist    313: Family, Gender, and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
Hist    335: Monsters, Marvels, and Museums
Hist    338: Mediterranean History
Hist    369: Muslim Spain: Glory, Decline, and Lasting Influence in Contemporary Spain
Hist    378: Sexuality and the Self in Modern Europe
Hist    379: Honor, Shame, and Violence in Modern Europe
Hist    389: European Cultural and Intellectual History, 1750-1890
Hist    397: The Origins and Conduct of World War II
Hist    406: From D-Day to Berlin: World War II Sites in England, France, Germany
InGS  202: Islam and the West
InGS  306: Spain in the European Union
InGS  307: Polish Film
Pols   350: Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union
Pols   351: Modern European Politics
Pols   364: European Union
Pols   431: Ethnicity and Political Violence
Relg  220: The Holocaust, Religion, and Morality
Span 301: Introduction to Spanish Literature I
Span 302: Introduction to Spanish Literature II
Span 310: Contemporary Spanish Culture and Civilization
Span 311: Spanish Culture and Civilization
Span 314: Introduction to Medieval Spain and the Road to Santiago
Span 334: Culture of Chivalry
Span 364: Spanish Women Writers (also WMST)
Span 401: Spanish Detective Novel from 1975 to the Present
Span 407: Spanish Women Writers from the Eighteenth Century to the Present
Span 412: Modern Spanish Literature II
Span 414: Modern Spanish Literary Movements
Span 420: Modern Spanish Drama
Span 421: The Spanish Civil War and Franco's Era
Span 422: Major Hispanic Women Writers
Span 495: Senior Seminar

D. Latin America and the Caribbean: Courses in this sub-category contribute to students’ overall understanding that this geographic region has been shaped in complex ways by globalizing processes such as colonization, capitalist production and exchange, imperialism, the migration of people and the exchange of ideas. This is not a static or isolated geographic area, as both Latin America and the Caribbean are also characterized by a great deal of cultural diversity and resulting concerns about national and ethnic identity, social inequality and unrest, political struggle and democratization. Dynamism is a profound source of creativity as these countries are also home to some of the most vibrant social movements, artistic productions, and scholarship of our time.

Anth  305: Cultures of Latin America
Anth  311: Gender and Class in Latin America
INGS 310: Brazilian Tropicalia: The Myth and Reality of an Emerging Power
Hist    223: Latin American History to 1825
Hist    224: Latin American History after 1826
Hist    358: Women in Latin America
Hist    359: U.S. and Latin America Since 1898
Hist    360: Latin American Topics
Hist    367: Writing the Nation: Literature, Nationalism and the Search for Identity in Latin America: 1810-present
Hist    410: Five Centuries of Atlantic Slavery, 1400-1900 
Musc  224: Music of Latin America
Pols   311: Politics of Central America and the Caribbean
Pols   318: Comparative Politics: South America and Mexico
Pols   367: Political Economy of Asia and Latin America
Span 303: Introduction to Latin American Literature 1
Span 304: Introduction to Latin American Literature 2
Span 305: 20th- and 21st-Century Spanish-American Poetry
Span 350: Cultural Icons in Latin America
Span 351: Migration in Latin American and Latino Literature and Film
Span 360: History of Latin American Cinema
Span 368: Latin American Literature in Neoliberal Times
Span 388: Women Authors of the Hispanic Caribbean and its Diaspora
Span 389: U.S. Latino and Latina Literature and Culture
Span 405: Spanish-American Novel
Span 406: Contemporary Hispanic Caribbean Literature and Culture
Span 409: Marvel and Margin in Latin American Culture
Span 410: Spanish-American Short Fiction and Film
Span 422: Latin American Women Authors
Span 425: Contemporary Central American Literature and Film

E. The Middle East: Courses in this sub-category analyze the region’s place in world history, international politics, and the global economic system. Challenging stereotypes of the region as monolithic, timeless, and isolated from world events, classes on the Middle East and North Africa emphasize the diversity and dynamism of a region that has frequently influenced the course of world events. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the region’s encounters with outside powers and global forces including Western imperialism, capitalism, and transnational religious forces, in order to understand how the Middle East shapes and is in turn shaped by our modern globalized world.

ArtH  210: Islamic Art and Architecture
Fren 417: Topics of the French-Speaking World (Glacet)
Hist   296: History of the Middle East I
Hist   297: History of the Middle East II
Hist   298: History of Islam
Hist   307: Revolutions and Revolutionaries in the Middle East
Hist   310: Modern Iraq and the U.S.-Iraq Conflict
Hist   319: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
Hist   338: Mediterranean History
Hist   430: Political Islam
Ings  202: Islam and the West
Ings  311: Islam and Ecology
InGS 313:  "Foreigners" of the Middle East

F. Russia and Eurasia: Courses in this sub-category consider the region from the perspectives of history, politics, literature, and culture. They examine the Russian Revolution, world wars and other conflicts; authoritarian regimes; experiments in socialism and communism; and more recent democratization efforts. Other important themes include nationalism, migration and shifting borders, and attempts at defining identity in relation to East and West via a narrative of exceptionalism. The cultural richness of the region, including ethnic and religious diversity as well as innovations in literature, film, art, and music, is a central area of focus. These courses study the complex history of the region with emphasis on how past events continue to shape its current geopolitical, economic and environmental realities.

Hist   207: Russia: Autocracy, Orthodoxy, Serfdom, Revolution
Hist   208: Russia: Revolution and Repression, War and Cold War, Collapse and Renewal
Hist   346: History of Socialism
Hist   364: Topics in Russian History
Hist   397: The Origins and Conduct of World War II
Pols  340: Ethnicity and Political Violence
Pols  350: Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union
Pols  351: Modern European Politics
Pols  364: European Union
Rusn 304: Contemporary Russian in Cultural Context
Rusn 310: Russian Civilization
Rusn 352: 20th-Century Russian Literature in English translation
Rusn 354: Real Men, Real Women? Gender in 20th-Century Russian Literature and Culture
Rusn 355: Russian and Soviet Film
Rusn 356: Nabokov
Rusn 363: Environmentalism and Ecocide in Russian Literature and Culture